Florida Aquarium sea turtle, Jupiter, visits the vet

The Florida Aquarium’s Animal Response Team completed a wellness check on Jupiter, a 75-pound endangered loggerhead sea turtle.
Veterinarian Dr. Ari Fustukian examines the mouth of Jupiter, a loggerhead turtle at the Florida Aquarium's Center for Conservation in Apollo Beach.
Veterinarian Dr. Ari Fustukian examines the mouth of Jupiter, a loggerhead turtle at the Florida Aquarium's Center for Conservation in Apollo Beach.
Published June 14

The Florida Aquarium’s Animal Response Team completed a wellness check on Jupiter, a 75-pound endangered loggerhead sea turtle, before transferring Jupiter into a one-of-a-kind rehabilitation pool.

The pool holds 25,000 gallons of water and is 11 feet deep making it the largest sea turtle-exclusive rehabilitation pool in Florida. Jupiter, whose sex is not yet known, was the first patient to use the pool ahead of World Sea Turtle Day on Sunday, June 16. Jupiter will spend time swimming in a smaller enclosure — created with PVC pipes and plastic fencing — before it is released into the larger pool to test its swimming, hunting and eating skills. Jupiter will also need to put on more weight as a full-size loggerhead sea turtle can weigh between 300 pounds and 400 pounds. Once the team determines Jupiter is at full health, it will be released back into the wild.

Veterinarian Dr. Ari Fustukjian and Senior Sea Turtle Biologist Rachel Thomas weigh Jupiter, a rescued loggerhead turtle, at Florida Aquarium's Center for Conservation in Apollo Beach. Jupiter weighed 75 pounds, which was more than he weighed when he was first rescued. When fully grown, loggerhead turtles can weigh between 300 pounds and 400 pounds.
Veterinarian Dr. Ari Fustukjian and Senior Sea Turtle Biologist Rachel Thomas weigh Jupiter, a rescued loggerhead turtle, at Florida Aquarium's Center for Conservation in Apollo Beach. Jupiter weighed 75 pounds, which was more than he weighed when he was first rescued. When fully grown, loggerhead turtles can weigh between 300 pounds and 400 pounds.
Biologist Kate Hartwig, left, and veterinarian Dr. Ari Fustukjian lift Jupiter, a loggerhead turtle, onto an examination table to give Jupiter a wellness check.
Biologist Kate Hartwig, left, and veterinarian Dr. Ari Fustukjian lift Jupiter, a loggerhead turtle, onto an examination table to give Jupiter a wellness check.
The Florida Aquarium's Animal Response team is unable to determine if Jupiter is a male or female loggerhead turtle until it grows more.
The Florida Aquarium's Animal Response team is unable to determine if Jupiter is a male or female loggerhead turtle until it grows more.
Biologist Kate Hartwig, Senior Sea Turtle Biologist Rachel Thomas and veterinarian Dr. Ari Fustukjian transfer Jupiter into a deep dive pool. The pool holds 25,000 gallons of water and is 11 feet deep. It's the deepest and largest turtle-exclusive pool for rehabilitation in the state of Florida. Jupiter is the first patient to use the deep dive pool.
Biologist Kate Hartwig, Senior Sea Turtle Biologist Rachel Thomas and veterinarian Dr. Ari Fustukjian transfer Jupiter into a deep dive pool. The pool holds 25,000 gallons of water and is 11 feet deep. It's the deepest and largest turtle-exclusive pool for rehabilitation in the state of Florida. Jupiter is the first patient to use the deep dive pool.
Jupiter pokes its head out of the water while swimming in the deep dive pool.
Jupiter pokes its head out of the water while swimming in the deep dive pool.

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