Tuesday, September 25, 2018
Opinion

Column: How fatal shootings by police were cut in half, and how we might do it again

Controversial shootings by police lead to a national outcry and a range of reforms that reduce police killings of suspects by half. Sound like a pie-in-the-sky hope? It is precisely what happened in the 1970s and 1980s.

Americaís virtually forgotten success at reducing gun violence by police is recounted in a new article by Lawrence W. Sherman, a criminologist at the University of Maryland. Police violence against crime suspects was a major civil rights issue in the late 1960s, highlighted most vividly by Chicago Mayor Richard Daleyís order for police to fire at looters during the 1968 riots.

Under the influence of reform-minded police chiefs such as Patrick Murphy in Washington and later in New York City, the 1970s brought dramatic changes in the training, supervision and monitoring of big-city police officers. Many cities banned police from shooting at fleeing nonviolent suspects, firing warning shots into the air or shooting at cars. (New York police officers killed 93 people in 1971; the number dropped to 11 in 1985.)

Sherman credits Murphy with "establishing the equivalent of a National Transportation Safety Board to conduct a formal inquiry on every single firearms discharge." One of the review boardís recommendations "was to convert annual refresher firearms training from target practice to role play simulations with actors in a mock apartment building, in a series of shoot-donít shoot scenarios, mock guns drawn." Police learned through such training to defuse many situations that previously would have led to gunfire.

Academic research was also critical in demonstrating fewer shootings by police did not translate into greater risk of violence toward officers. Police killings of suspects declined by half nationally from 1970 to 1985. The principal beneficiaries of this change were black Americans. After rising as high as 7 to 1, the rate at which black versus white suspects in large cities were killed by police declined to 2.8 to 1 by the end of the 1970s.

With the rise of crack cocaine, an increase in police departments switching from revolvers to semiautomatic pistols and a 1989 Supreme Court decision expanding the immunity of police who harm suspects, killings by police began to rise in the 1990s. Today, they are at least as much a focus of national outrage and agony as they were in the late 1960s. Turning back the tide of killings by police should be easier this time around because successful strategies for doing so were developed and widely employed only a generation ago.

© 2018 Washington Post

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