Tuesday, September 18, 2018
Nation & World

Trump: NATO pullout ‘no longer necessary’ after members agree to spending increases

BRUSSELS (AP) ó President Donald Trump on Thursday reaffirmed his commitment to the NATO alliance after he said member nations caved to his demands by making significant pledges to increasing defense spending.

"The United Statesí commitment to NATO remains very strong," Trump told reporters at a surprise news conference following an emergency session of NATO members held to address his complaints.

Trump has berated members of the alliance for failing to spend enough of their money on defense, accusing Europe of freeloading off the U.S. and raising doubts about whether he would come to membersí defense if they were attacked.

Trump said he made his anger clear to allies on Wednesday.

"Yesterday I let them know that I was extremely unhappy with what was happening," Trump said, adding that, in response, European countries agreed to up their spending.

"They are going to up it to levels like they have never though it before," he said. He did not specify which countries had committed to what

NATO countries in 2014 committed to spending 2 percent of their gross domestic products on defense by 2024, but NATO has estimated that only 15 members, or just over half, will meet the benchmark by 2024 based on current trends.

Earlier Thursday, Trump called out U.S. allies on Twitter as he attended a second day of meetings with leaders of the military alliance.

In a series of tweets from Brussels, Trump said "Presidents have been trying unsuccessfully for years to get Germany and other rich NATO Nations to pay more toward their protection from Russia."

He complained the United States "pays tens of Billions of Dollars too much to subsidize Europe" and demanded that member nations meet their pledge to spend 2 percent of GDP on defense, which "must ultimately go to 4%!"

Trump has taken an aggressive tone during the NATO summit, questioning the value of an alliance that has defined decades of American foreign policy, torching an ally and proposing a massive increase in European defense spending.

Under fire for his warm embrace of Russiaís Vladimir Putin, Trump on Wednesday turned a harsh spotlight on Germanyís own ties to Russia, alleging that a natural gas pipeline venture with Moscow has left Angela Merkelís government "totally controlled" and "captive" to Russia.

He continued the attack Thursday, complaining that "Germany just started paying Russia, the country they want protection from, Billions of Dollars for their Energy needs coming out of a new pipeline from Russia."

"Not acceptable!" he railed before arriving late at NATO headquarters for morning meetings that will include talks with the leaders of Azerbaijan, Romania, Ukraine and Georgia. In the afternoon, he heads to his next stop: the United Kingdom.

Peter Navarro, director of the White House National Trade Council, echoed Trumpís rhetoric, telling Fox Business Network that "Germany is a tremendous problem, both for Europe itself, and for the United States in this sense."

"Whatís more surprising, the fact that the President Trump is calling them out on that or that previous presidents havenít?" he asked. "Itís really extraordinary that Donald Trump has to be the person to point out that the emperor in Europe has no clothes."

Merkel, who grew up in communist East Germany, shot back that she had "experienced myself a part of Germany controlled by the Soviet Union, and Iím very happy today that we are united in freedom as the Federal Republic of Germany and can thus say that we can determine our own policies and make our own decisions and thatís very good."

During the trip, Trump has questioned the necessity of the alliance that formed a bulwark against Soviet aggression, tweeting after a day of contentious meetings: "What good is NATO if Germany is paying Russia billions of dollars for gas and energy?"

He demanded that NATO countries "Must pay 2% of GDP IMMEDIATELY, not by 2025" and then rattled them further by privately suggesting member nations should spend 4 percent of their gross domestic product on defense ó a bigger share than even the United States currently pays, according to NATO statistics.

It was the most recent in a series of demands and insults that critics fear will undermine the decades-old alliance, coming days before Trump sits down with Putin at the conclusion of his closely watched European trip.

Trump has described the spending situation as "disproportionate and not fair to the taxpayers of the United States."

However, a formal summit declaration issued by the NATO leaders Wednesday reaffirmed their "unwavering commitment" to the 2 percent pledge set in 2014 and made no reference to any effort to get to 4 percent.

Trump has been more conciliatory behind the scenes, including at a leadersí dinner Wednesday.

"I have to tell you that the atmosphere last night at dinner was very open, was very constructive and it was very positive," Kolinda Grabar-Kitarovic, the president of Croatia, told reporters.

Amid the tumult, British Prime Minister Theresa May, whose government is in turmoil over her plans for exiting the European Union, sounded a call for solidarity among allies.

"As we engage Russia we must do so from a position of unity and strength - holding out hope for a better future, but also clear and unwavering on where Russia needs to change its behavior for this to become a reality," she said.

Although Trump administration officials point to the longstanding alliance between the United States and the United Kingdom, Trumpís itinerary in England will largely keep him out of central London, where significant protests are expected.

Instead, a series of events ó a black-tie dinner with business leaders, a meeting with May and an audience with Queen Elizabeth II ó will happen outside the bustling city, where Mayor Sadiq Khan has been in a verbal battle with Trump.

Woody Johnson, the U.S. ambassador to the United Kingdom, dismissed the significance of the protests, telling Fox News that one of the reasons the two countries are so close "is because we have the freedoms that weíve all fought for. And one of the freedoms we have is freedom of speech and the freedom to express your views. And I know thatís valued very highly over here and people can disagree strongly and still go out to dinner."

He also said meeting the queen would be an experience Trump "will really cherish."

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