How to watch tonight’s Orionid meteor shower

Considered one of “most beautiful meteor showers of the year” by NASA, the Orionids are expected to peak Monday night into Tuesday morning.
A meteor is seen streaking left to right above the constellation Orion in the early hours of Dec. 14, 2012 in the sky above Tyler, Texas.  The metor is part of the Geminid meteor shower, which is peaking tonight.  As many as 50 per hour are being seen.  The meteors radiate from the region of sky containing the constellation Gemini which give them their name.  (AP Photo/Dr. Scott M. Lieberman) Dr. Scott M. Lieberman  |  AP
A meteor is seen streaking left to right above the constellation Orion in the early hours of Dec. 14, 2012 in the sky above Tyler, Texas. The metor is part of the Geminid meteor shower, which is peaking tonight. As many as 50 per hour are being seen. The meteors radiate from the region of sky containing the constellation Gemini which give them their name. (AP Photo/Dr. Scott M. Lieberman) Dr. Scott M. Lieberman | AP
Published October 21
Updated October 21

Look into the night sky tonight or tomorrow and you’ll likely see 10-15 shooting stars an hour.

The shooting stars will be a part of this year’s Orionid meteor shower, which will be at its best and brightest on Monday and Tuesday night in North America.

The annual event occurs throughout October but has its peak at different times. Stargazers will hope for a clear sky in order to see the meteors, which should become visible as soon as the sun sets around 7 p.m. tonight, according to NASA.

NASA says the meteors are known for their brightness and speed, traveling at a rate of 148,000 miles per hour. The Orionids come from debris from Halley’s Comet and gets its name as it appears to come from a radiant within the constellation Orion.

To best view the meteors, NASA says to find “an area well away from city or street lights” and to “come prepared with a sleeping bag, blanket or lawn chair.”

NASA also recommends you lay flat on your back with your feet facing southeast if you are in the Northern Hemisphere. After giving your eyes some time to adjust to the darkness, you will begin to see meteors in less than 30 minutes.


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